How to get absolute bliss

 

 

‘If everything is reduced to the one,

To what is the one reduced.’

 

 

The creator of the medieval Chinese Chan conundrum (i.e. kung-an, or koan) quoted above was a true Buddha, a master wanker. He clearly understood that the key to the ultimate experience (or the experience of the Ultimate (namely perfection and its after-effect, namely the honeymoon affect)) is (self-) condensation, i.e. the reduction of a complex self to point (i.e. to unit or quantum, i.e. @1) status/stillness, prior to (random) contact (and which produces the desired experience of the Ultimate).

 

The first part of the conundrum, ‘If everything is reduced to the one,’ (to wit: the nun must reduce to one-ness or @1’ness status, hence kill off self-interaction to reach absolute stillness, deadness) describes the approach (i.e. as 1st jhana, first described by Guatama, the Sakyamuni) to perfection, i.e. to the ultimate as speed @c.

 

The second part, the actual conundrum, ‘To what is the one reduced’, is a red herring (or a wild swan (Sanskrit: paramahansa) chase). Obviously, the one cannot be reduced further since the one has already eliminated the redundant (because same) bits within). It’s because it cannot be reduced further, but the nun keeps trying, that the latter’s concentration (i.e. as degree of self-condensation) continues to increase, until it reaches the capacity of @c, i.e. of @1’ness.

That, of course, was the trick with all later koans, that is to say, the later koans made no sense, much like the famous maxim from the Chandogya Upanishad, “That thou art” (Sanskrit, “tat tvam asi”), and which is fundamentally meaningless, therefore a perfect concentration focus, provided one believes that it does have a meaning).

 

The 1st part is linear activity. The 2nd part is resolved by a lateral shift, i.e. by experiencing the self-affect of contact (with a random (hence lateral, indeed ubiquitous) event) when @1’ness concentration, hence the state/contact speed (of @c) of the one, had been reached. However, the problem resolution has to be found spontaneously by the nun so that she can experience the solution fully (i.e. wholly, i.e. from within and as a self-whole experience), i.e. as an (everyday) mind-blowing experience.

 

In other words, when the nun’s concentration becomes one-pointed, that is to say, when she (i.e. her self) condenses to unit or quantum status, therefore to the capacity to connect @c, sudden (random) contact with another (hence random) unit or quantum (for instance, a twig snapping or another nun farting) will produce, indeed simulate perfection and which in turn will generate a wholly acceptable solution (true or false) to the conundrum, namely perfect, i.e. absolute (albeit momentary, though experienced by the @1, hence one-pointed nun, as timeless) realness, followed by perfect (non-different) consciousness, followed by perfect (i.e. absolute) freedom (bliss).

 

Had the Chinese Buddha who invented this conundrum described the whole method correctly, to wit:

 

‘If everything is reduced to the one,

What happens when the one makes contact?’

 

he would have given the game away, thereby preventing the spontaneous (hence random) discovery and experience of the solution by the nun. By giving the game away he would have prevented her from reaching the desired experience of absolute realness, absolute consciousness and absolute bliss state, all the former being experienced as absolute because of the @1’ness (hence absoluteness, hence perfection + joy) state (or gear/speed) of the nun at the contact (hence breakthrough, i.e. enlightenment or satori) moment.

 

Since the goal of the artificial (i.e. arbitrary) exercise (that is to say, of artificial problem solving, to wit. the Inner Pilgrimage) is to help the nun self-produce the ultimate and extremely blissful experience, that is to say, without having to solve a real problem in the everyday world, thereby becoming connected or attached to the results of the everyday problem solution, the whole exercise is actually (mental) self-gratification, i.e. masturbation. In other words, achieving (orgasmic) bliss without fertilization (i.e. without real contact that results in transfer of self, i.e. of own identity elements (i.e. information as instruction packs)) is essentially wanking.

In short, the nuns (such as Teresa of Avila and Catherine of Siena) and yoginis of old (and new, i.e. all meditation practitioners) and, of course, the monks and yogis, were (and still are) wanking their brains for bliss, but avoiding attachment (i.e. reality testing) and the consequences that result from attachment.

 

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